Friday, 16 April 2010

The Gloria: Glory to God in the Highest

The Latin, Old Translation, and New Translation of the Gloria, changes in bold

Click here for a link to a downloadable WORD document of this material

The Latin
Glória in excélsis Deo
et in terra pax homínibus bonae voluntátis.
Laudámus te,
benedícimus te,
adorámus te,
glorificámus te,
grátias ágimus tibi propter magnam glóriam tuam,
Dómine Deus, Rex cæléstis,
Deus Pater omnípotens.
Dómine Fili Unigénite, Iesu Christe,
Dómine Deus, Agnus Dei,
Fílius Patris,
qui tollis peccáta mundi,
miserére nobis;
qui tollis peccáta mundi,
súscipe deprecatiónem nostram.
Qui sedes ad déxteram Patris,
miserére nobis.
Quóniam tu solus Sanctus,
tu solus Dóminus,
tu solus Altíssimus,
Iesu Christe, cum Sancto Spíritu:
in glória Dei Patris. Amen

Old Translation
Glory to God in the highest,
and peace to his people on earth.
Lord God, heavenly King,
almighty God and Father,
we worship you, we give you thanks, we praise you for your glory
.
Lord Jesus Christ,
only Son of the Father,
Lord God, Lamb of God,
you take away the sin of the world:
have mercy on us;
you are seated at the right hand of the Father:
receive our prayer.
For you alone are the Holy One,
you alone are the Lord,
you alone are the Most High, Jesus Christ, with the Holy Spirit,
in the glory of God the Father. Amen


New Translation

Glory to God in the highest,
and on earth peace to people of good will. [c.f. Lk 2:14]
We praise you,
we bless you,
we adore you,
we glorify you,
we give you thanks for your great glory,
Lord God, heavenly King,
O God, almighty Father.

Lord Jesus Christ, Only Begotten Son,
Lord God, Lamb of God,
Son of the Father,
you take away the sins of the world,
have mercy on us;
you take away the sins of the world,
receive our prayer;
you are seated at the right hand of the Father, have mercy on us.

For you alone are the Holy One,
you alone are the Lord,
you alone are the Most High,
Jesus Christ, with the Holy Spirit,
in the glory of God the Father. Amen.

The Gloria has its origin in the hymn of praise sung by the angels at Jesus’ birth when they appeared to the shepherds in the field at night. The angels sang, “Glory to God on the highest, and on earth peace to people of good will” (Lk 2:14).

The angels’ hymn was elaborated by early Christians and its present Latin form, as above, is first recorded in the 4th Century though most of it can be traced to the 3rd, 2nd, or even 1st Century.[1] As such, this is one of the oldest prayers of the Mass and by saying it we are uniting ourselves with almost the entire history of Christianity. It is therefore hardly surprising that the new translation should seek to have us return to the rhythm and structure of this ancient prayer.

The words in bold print indicate the parts of the text that are changed in the new translation. As can be seen above, while the changes are slight they are nonetheless continual through almost the entire text. The overall change, however, is in the structure and rhythm of the text which will enable us to re-connect with the format that has been used by the Church for almost our entire history.

[1]http://www.newadvent.org/cathen/06583a.htm

Fr Dylan James, Shaftesbury, 16th April 2010

2 comments:

  1. Really very relevant artical with the topic it is good work. http://www.translation.pk

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  2. Thankkk-you I jussst had a uplifting praise to our Father with one voice he shaall be Praised

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